Postural alignment involves finding symmetry, positioning body parts optimally for strength and control, and being energy efficient against gravity. Poor posture stresses the body and can make you tired. Many health professionals work with postural integration, poise, breathing and balance – they all involve posture in standing. We never really stand still – we have something called postural sway – moderate amounts can be good for circulation, but too much can be a predisposing factor for a fall. Movement is in fact just a series of postures, one moment after another. Different postures require different combinations of active and passive interventions, and feedback from an expert is often necessary.

 

1. Knee bend – side lying

Extend the hip and bend the knee to the buttock.

 

2. Hamstring stretch – on back

Flex the hip to 90 degrees, knee straight, back and opposite leg flat on the floor

 

3. Cobra – on elbows

With hips and forearms flat on the floor, raise the shoulders off the floor.

 

4. Cobra – on hands

With hips and hands flat on the floor, raise the shoulders off the floor, and look up to the ceiling.

 

5. Cat stretch

On your hand and knees, with hips and shoulders at 90 degrees. Start with a flat back.

Tuck the head under and flex the trunk up to the ceiling .

Then lift the head and arch the back down to the floor.

 

6. Lunge stretch

Keeping the hips horizontal and facing forwards, trunk upright, extend the hip and feel a stretch across the front of the hip. 

 

7. Shoulder stretch

Stand with feet 45 degrees away from the wall. Rest the forearm on the wall and have the upper arm at a comfortable height for the shoulder.

Gently turn the body and head away from the wall, and feel a gentle stretch in the chest muscles.

 

8. Shoulder stabilisation

Stand with your heals, buttocks, shoulders and head against the wall. Keep the posture tall and upright. Lift straight arms to shoulder height, with relaxed neck and shoulders.

Open the arms against the rubber band, and feel the muscles working at the back of the shoulders.

 

9. Child pose

Starting on your hand and knees, with hips and shoulders at 90 degrees.

Rock backwards gently with the hips and keep the hands on the floor, opening the chest and shoulders.

 

10. Shoulder retraction

Stand with the heels and buttocks against the wall. Feel the distance between the wall and the shoulders.

Lift the ribcage and draw the shoulder back and down to rest against the wall.

 

11. Neck retraction

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Stand with the heels and hips against the wall. Look straight ahead. Feel the distance between the wall and the back of the head. Lift the ribcage and draw the shoulder back and down to rest against the wall.

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Place a finger on the chin, and gently guide the chin in towards the wall, and lengthen the neck upwards.

 

12. Abdominal hollowing

Lie relaxed face down on the floor, legs extended and feet together. Place your hands under the abdomen either side of the navel. Lift the navel towards the spine, and feel the pressure on your hands decrease. 

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13. Bracing

Lie relaxed on your back, hips and knees bent. Place the hands on the abdomen adjacent to the navel. Draw the navel down to the spine without moving the pelvis or the ribs.

 

14. Bracing + hip flexion

Lie relaxed on your back, hips and knees bent. Place the hands on the abdomen adjacent to the navel. Draw the navel down to the spine without moving the pelvis or the ribs, and hold.

Keep the pelvis in the same position, whilst you slowly lift one foot 10 cm from the floor. Lower down slowly and alternate legs. 

 

15. Plank – wall

Stand slightly away from the wall, and lean into the wall, placing your forearms flat on the wall at a comfortable shoulder height. Gently draw in your navel towards your spine and try to maintain a straight line from the ankles, knees, hips, shoulders and ears.

 

16. Plank – floor

Start with a plank on the knees and progress to the toes (in video at 0:30) according to ability, always with good technique. Lie on the floor and gently raise your trunk and hips from the floor. Gently draw in your navel towards your spine and try to maintain a straight line from the ankles, knees, hips, shoulders and ears

 

17. Foot posture

Maintain the contact of the inside and outside pads of the forefoot and the centre of the heel with the ground. 

Try to maintain a neutral position.

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 ⚠️  Avoid a fallen arch (sometimes called pronation).

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⚠️ Avoid a high arch (sometimes called supination). Try not to tilt the inside of the foot off the floor.

 

2017 © Qinematic AB • All rights reserved
Model: Glenn Bilby
Text: Glenn Bilby
Photos : Christian Crusius